Ikemefuna and okonkwo relationship

Father-Son Relationship In Things Fall Apart | Little Brown Book

ikemefuna and okonkwo relationship

Free Essay: Ikemefuna relationship to Okonkwo is like a father-son relationship because he really didn't care about anyone else like he cared about Ikemefuna. In those three years, he grows very close to Okonkwo's family, especially Nwoye. Okonkwo even prefers him to his true son Nwoye, considering Ikemefuna to be. Grows a close relationship with Nwoye. Okonkwo's entire family is very fond of Ikemefuna. The elders order for Ikemefuna to be killed, which.

Why is Ikemefuna killed? How does Nwoye react to the sacrifice? Okonkwo changes significantly after the killing of Ikemefuna.

Why does Nwoye convert to Christianity? How does his conversion affect his relationship with his father? How is his portrayal different from the Igbo characters? Compare and contrast him with other white colonists. How do his actions show disdain for Igbo traditions? Setting and Society 1.

The novel begins in Umuofia and ends in Umuofia. What surprises you about life in an African tribal community? What preconceptions did you bring to your reading that were either reinforced or changed?

Why do the community celebrations make Okonkwo unhappy? Igbo culture is patriarchal. What is the role of women in the community? Does their role make them less valuable than men? How does wife beating reflect the community attitude toward women?

Things Fall Apart Teacher’s Guide

Near the beginning of the novel, we learn that Okonkwo has several wives. What does this arrangement reveal about family life in the community? Describe the Igbo extended family system. How does it help Okonkwo to survive his exile in Mbanta?

Compare and contrast Umuofia and Mbanta. How do their similarities and differences add to an understanding of the Igbo culture? A significant social marker in Igbo society is the honorific title system. Describe how the use of titles allows Igbo members to compare themselves with each other. What is the symbolic meaning of the Week of Peace for the Igbo people? Agriculture is important in the Igbo community. How does sharecropping contribute to the prosperity of the community?

How does it affect individuals? What is the significance of the yam? What is the purpose of the New Yam Festival? How is it related to the religion of the community? Explain the concept of ogbanje. Show how it is reflected in the relationship of Ekwefi and Ezinma.

What do these rituals reveal about the level of sophistication of pre-colonial Igbo civilization? How does pre-colonial life in Umuofia differ from Western society? Cite examples of any similarities and differences.

Themes and Motifs 1. How is the theme of fate or destiny illustrated through the actions of the characters? Fear is pervasive throughout the novel. How does fear affect the actions of Okonkwo? How is the concept of change and the response to change presented in the novel? What is the significance of the song sung at the end of Chapter Twelve? How does this new song convey the theme of change?

How does Chukwu compare with the Christian concept of a supreme being? Use the conversation between Akunna and Mr. Brown to support your comparison. How is Christianity depicted? Why does Achebe focus on the Trinity? How does education advance Christianity among the Igbo people?

What are the human consequences of the collision between the two cultures? Describe both the societal and personal clashes. Imagery and Language 1.

ikemefuna and okonkwo relationship

Achebe seamlessly merges Igbo vocabulary into the general text. Explain how he helps readers to understand Igbo words and concepts that have no English language equivalents.

How does this use of language convey a sense of Igbo culture? Explain the importance of folktales in the informal education of the children. Why does Nwoye like the tales of his mother better than those of his father? How does the legend of the old woman with one leg help to explain why the other clans fear Umuofia? How does the language of the women and children differ from that used by the priests, diviners, and titled men? What is the significance of this difference? Wrestling is a recurring image.

Father-Son Relationship In Things Fall Apart

In addition to the literal match at the beginning of the novel, what are other examples of the theme of wrestling and how do they contribute to the overall theme? What is the significance of the drums in communication among the villages of Umuofia? Why are they esoteric? What is the significance of the pidgin English that is used for communication between the Igbo people and the colonists?

For Discussion and Assignment 1. Read this poem and apply it to the breakdown of African society as described in the novel. What is the significance of the three proverbs in Chapter One? How do proverbs promote the narrative action in the novel?

What do they reveal about Igbo culture? Locate additional proverbs in the novel and explain their meaning and how they foster Igbo tradition. Is Okonkwo a tragic hero? Compare Okonkwo with Oedipus, who is punished for the inadvertent murder of his father.

How do they attempt to escape their fate? What are the tragic flaws that cause their downfalls? Ikemefuna became very close to Nwoye, and Okonkwo's decision to participate in Ikemefuna's death takes a toll on Okonkwo's relationship with Nwoye. Ezinma is Okonkwo's favorite daughter, and the only child of his wife Ekwefi. Ezinma, the Crystal Beauty, is very much the antithesis of a normal woman within the culture and Okonkwo routinely remarks that she would've made a much better boy than a girl, even wishing that she had been born as one.

Ezinma often contradicts and challenges her father, which wins his adoration, affection, and respect. She is very similar to her father, and this is made apparent when she matures into a beautiful young woman who refuses to marry during her family's exile, instead choosing to help her father regain his place of respect within society. Obierika is Okonkwo's best friend from Umuofia. He is a strong and powerful man in Umuofia, but unlike Okonkwo, he is a reasoning man and is much less violent and arrogant.

Obierika often talks Okonkwo out of making rash decisions, and helps Okonkwo when he is on exile from Umuofia. He fully understands the changes going on in their society, and that their clan no longer had the unity it did before the white man appeared in Umuofia.

Obierika's son, Maduka, is greatly admired by Okonkwo for his wrestling prowess, which in Okonkwo's opinion is something his own son, Nwoye lacks. Obierika is considered the voice of reason in the book, and questions certain parts of their culture, such as the necessity to exile Okonkwo after he unintentionally kills a boy.

Ogbuefi Ezeudu is one of the elders of Umuofia. He is regarded as very wise, and gives Okonkwo good advice.

ikemefuna and okonkwo relationship

He is the one who brings Okonkwo the message from the Oracle that Ikemefuna should be killed, but he also warns Okonkwo not to participate in the boy's execution, since Ikemefuna calls Okonkwo "father", a warning Okonkwo does not heed. At Ezeudu's funeral, Okonkwo's gun misfires, accidentally killing the dead elder's son, for which Okonkwo and his family go into exile. Brown is a white man who comes to Umuofia. Unlike most Europeans portrayed in the novel, he shows kindness and compassion towards the villagers, thereby earning their love and respect.

He eventually develops an illness that leads to his death. Background[ edit ] Most of the story takes place in the fictional village of Iguedo, which is in the Umuofia clan. Umuofia is located west of the actual city of Onitshaon the east bank of the Niger River in Nigeria.

The events of the novel unfold in the s. The customs described in the novel mirror those of the actual Onitsha people, who lived near Ogidi, and with whom Achebe was familiar. Within forty years of the arrival of the British, by the time Achebe was born inthe missionaries were well established. He lived in the British culture but he refused to change his Igbo name Chinua to Albert. Achebe's father was among the first to be converted in Ogidi, around the turn of the century.

Achebe himself was an orphan raised by his grandfather. His grandfather, far from opposing Achebe's conversion to Christianity, allowed Achebe's Christian marriage to be celebrated in his compound. In a interview with The Paris ReviewAchebe said, "the novel form seems to go with the English language. There is a problem with the Igbo language. It suffers from a very serious inheritance which it received at the beginning of this century from the Anglican mission.

They sent out a missionary by the name of Dennis. He was a scholar. He had this notion that the Igbo language—which had very many different dialects—should somehow manufacture a uniform dialect that would be used in writing to avoid all these different dialects.

Because the missionaries were powerful, what they wanted to do they did. This became the law. But the standard version cannot sing.

Things Fall Apart - Wikipedia

There's nothing you can do with it to make it sing. It doesn't go anywhere. While both African and non-African critics agree that Achebe modelled Things Fall Apart on classic European literature, they disagree about whether his novel upholds a Western model, or, in fact, subverts or confronts it. Also, in the logic of colonization and decolonization it is actually a very powerful weapon in the fight to regain what was yours.

English was the language of colonization itself. It is not simply something you use because you have it anyway. It has come to be seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, [3] [6] and is read in Nigeria and throughout Africa. Of all of Achebe's works, Things Fall Apart is the one read most often, and has generated the most critical response, examination, and literary criticism.

It has achieved similar status and repute in India, Australia and Oceania. Achebe is now considered to be the essential novelist on African identity, nationalism, and decolonization. Achebe's main focus has been cultural ambiguity and contestation.

The complexity of novels such as Things Fall Apart depends on Achebe's ability to bring competing cultural systems and their languages to the same level of representation, dialogue, and contestation. Much of the critical discussion about Things Fall Apart concentrates on the socio-political aspects of the novel, including the friction between the members of Igbo society as they confront the intrusive and overpowering presence of Western government and beliefs.

Emenyonu commented that "Things Fall Apart is indeed a classic study of cross-cultural misunderstanding and the consequences to the rest of humanity, when a belligerent culture or civilization, out of sheer arrogance and ethnocentrismtakes it upon itself to invade another culture, another civilization.

In Things Fall Apart, western culture is portrayed as being "arrogant and ethnocentric," insisting that the African culture needed a leader. As it had no kings or chiefs, Umuofian culture was vulnerable to invasion by western civilization. It is felt that the repression of the Igbo language at the end of the novel contributes greatly to the destruction of the culture. Although Achebe favours the African culture of the pre-western society, the author attributes its destruction to the "weaknesses within the native structure.

Influence and legacy[ edit ] The publication of Achebe's Things Fall Apart helped pave the way for numerous other African writers. Novelists who published after Achebe were able to find an eloquent and effective mode for the expression of the particular social, historical, and cultural situation of modern Africa. Achebe broke from this outsider view, by portraying Igbo society in a sympathetic light.

ikemefuna and okonkwo relationship

This allows the reader to examine the effects of European colonialism from a different perspective. Because Achebe wrote in English, portrayed Igbo life from the point of view of an African man, and used the language of his people, he was able to greatly influence African novelists, who viewed him as a mentor. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichiethe author of the popular and critically acclaimed novels Purple Hibiscus and Half of a Yellow Suncommented in a interview: It featured Wole Soyinka in a supporting role.

Ina film adaptation of Things Fall Apart was made by a Nigerian production company with an all-Nigerian cast.